GHF2008 – PS12 – Social Determinants of Health: What is Next?

Session Outline

Parallel session PS12, Monday, May 26 2008, 11:00-12:30, Room 3
Chair(s): John-Paul Vader, Senior Lecturer, Health Care Evaluation Unit, University Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, Switzerland
Social Determinants of Health: What is Next?
Ndioro Ndiaye, Deputy Director-General, International Organization for Migration, Switzerland 
Social Determinants of Health: A Historical Perspective
Theodore Brown, Professor of History, Community and Preventive Medicine, and Medical Humanities, University of Rochester, USA  
Role of Civil Society in Addressing Social Determinants of Health
Hani Serag, Global Secretariat Coordinator, People’s Health Movement, Egypt
Social Determinants: What is Next for the WHO
Kumanan Rasanathan, Technical Officer, Department of Ethics, Equity, Trade and Human Rights, WHO, Switzerland 

Session Documents

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Session Report

Contributors: Kim Hye Rim (ICVolunteers)

The notions of 'Social Medicine', migration, macroeconomic and social policies, as well as cultural and societal values were discussed. Speakers from the University of Rochester in the USA, the International Organization for Migration, the People's Health Movement and the World Health Organization contributed to the discussion.

The session started with opening remarks by Mr. John-Paul Vader, Senior Lecturer, Health Care Evaluation Unit, University Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, Switzerland.

Mr. Theodore M. Brown, Professor of History, Community and Preventive Medicine, and Medical Humanities, University of Rochester, USA, presented a historical overview of several leading figures in 'Social Medicine': Rene Villerme, Rudolf Virchow, Andrija Stampar, Ludwik Rajchman, Sidney and Emily Kark, and Salvador Allende who addressed problems and possible solutions while struggling as leading members of progressive movements and organizations. Health inequities rooted in a social and economic order are difficult to overcome despite the considerable and repeated efforts. However, the ideas and actions of those figures in the past can provide courageous inspiration for the present and future generations.

Ms. Ndioro Ndiaye, Deputy Director-General, International Organisation for Migration, mainly talked about the Report of the Commission on the Social Determinants of Health (CSDH). By clarifying its aim, goal, and targets, she highlighted the problem of the migration of medical personnel, in particular. On an average, 1 in 4 African-trained doctors and 1 in 20 African-trained nurses work in countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), which means that healthcare workers are few in number in Africa. Recognizing migration as a fundamental human right, Ms. Ndiaye suggested establishing some incentive-based retention strategies in countries of origin and destination (Imcomplete report).

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