Geneva Health Forum Archive

Browse and download abstracts, posters, documents and videos from past editions of the GHF

GHF2014 – PL04 – Data and the Knowledge Economy: What is there for Global Health?

17:45
19:15
PL04 WEDNESDAY, 16 APRIL 2014 ROOM: 2 ICON_QA
DATA AND THE KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY:
WHAT IS THERE FOR GLOBAL HEALTH?

MODERATOR:
Dr. Carmelo Bisognano 
Head of Strategy, Inartis Foundation, Switzerland
TENTATIVE PANEL:
Prof. Angela Brand 
Professor of Social Medicine & Public Health Genomics
Institute for Public Health Genomics (IPHG), Cluster of Genetics & Cell Biology
Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, The Netherlands
Mr. Sridhar Venkapaturam 
MSc Global Health and Social Justice Program, Department of Social Science, Health & Medicine, King's College London
Prof. Christian Lovis
Professor of Clinical Informatics and leading the Division of Medical Information Sciences, Geneva University Hospitals, Switzerland
Mr. Andrew Filev
Founder and CEO, Wrike, United States
AIM:
This session will gather a panel of people from various disciplines to debate the promises and challenges big data brings to global health.
OUTLINE:
As social systems move from the physical world to the virtual world, technology has served as an enabling factor that has made it possible for human capital to be developed, shared and applied in new ways and at an immense scale and pace. The potential for capturing natural data organically has accelerated profoundly as well as the potential to shed light on connections/linkages between sets of information that were until then not processed or just analyzed in silos.  This increasing abundance of data, our ability to process it and use it meaningfully is causing what people have called a drift toward data-driven discovery and decision-making in various sectors including the health sector one. If data has become a core asset that provides a huge resource for new industries, processes, services and goods leading to significant competitive advantage, concerns for privacy and individual rights remain as well as how this new trend will benefit global health.
 PROFILES:

BisognanoDr. Carmelo Bisognano
Head of Strategy, Inartis Foundation, Switzerland

Prior to serve as Head of Strategy for Inartis Foundation, Dr. Bisognano founded and managed several companies such as Easymed Services Inc. (EZM:CN), a British Columbia, Canada, company. 

Dr. Bisognano had a post-doctoral position at the University Hospital of Geneva where he conducted research on molecular regulation of bacterial resistance. He is also the author of publications in international scientific journals and has obtained several awards for his research work (GSK and MSD Awards, Swiss Society for Infectious-Diseases).

Dr. Bisognano was also a biotechnology consultant for Geneva’s government, research institutes and a Marketing Manager in a bioinformatics company. More recently, he co- directed a course on Biotech valuation for MoT MBA (federal polytechnic school) and collaborated with investment funds for their strategic portfolio allocation.

 

Brand_Angela_squareProf. Angela Brand 
Professor of Social Medicine & Public Health Genomics
Institute for Public Health Genomics (IPHG), Cluster of Genetics & Cell Biology
Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, The Netherlands

Angela Brand is Founding Director and Full Professor of the Institute for Public Health Genomics (IPHG) at the Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences at Maastricht University, the Netherlands, as well as Dr. T.M. Pai Endowed Chair on Public Health Genomics and Adjunct Professor at the School of Life Sciences at Manipal University, India. Before she worked in the clinics, at various academic institutions and in governmental bodies in the USA and Germany. She is Paediatrician and Specialist in Public Health Medicine, holds a PhD in pathology and a Master of Public Health from Johns Hopkins University, USA. She has been the pioneer of Public Health Genomics in Europe and beyond and established this field in more than 15 European Member States within the last years (www.phgen.eu). Public Health Genomics is the field within Public Health demonstrating the need for a holistic “systems thinking” and translating research from “cell to society” towards the implementation of personalised healthcare between key stakeholders and across sectors. The IPHG is unique in Europe giving policy advice on the national, European and global level. Key expertise and industrial collaborations include regulatory issues, use of big data for health systems and ownership questions, valorisation, decision supporting tools such as Health Technology Assessment and development of the innovative LAL model™.

 

Vankatapuram_Sridhar_squareMr. Sridhar Venkapaturam 
MSc Global Health and Social Justice Program, Department of Social Science, Health & Medicine, King's College London

Mr. Sridhar Venkapaturam's career and research interests have their origins in his interest in topics such as development, international political economy, and human rights.  While he was planning throughout his college education on becoming an international lawyer that would work in the area of international development, an internship at Human Rights Watch changed that course.  He was the first person at HRW to examine a health issue, specifically HIV/AIDS, from a human rights monitoring perspective.  The difficulty of HRW to recognize a human right to health as well as the prevailing idea in public health that individual rights must be sacrificed for the greater good put him on the path of developing a philosophical argument for a moral right to be healthy.  He trained in a number of relevant disciplines such a public health, sociology, economics and political philosophy.  And he currently runs a graduate programme at King’s College London called Global Health and Social Justice.  His research includes such topics as theories of social and global justice and health, the philosophy and ethics of health inequalities, the human right to health, the ethics and philosophy of health economics, et cetera.

PL04_Christian_LovisProf. Christian Lovis

Christian Lovis is professor of clinical informatics at the University of Geneva and leads the Division of Medical Information Sciences at the Geneva University Hospitals. Christian is a medical doctor trained in Internal Medicine. He is heavily involved in the Swiss federal projects around eHealth as co-chair of several working groups. He has developed the clinical information system at HUG and his involved in several large pan-European projects around using big data for bio-surveillance or clinical research. Christian is member of the governing council of HIMSS Europe and board member of HIMSS World Wide.

AndrewFilevCloseMr. Andrew Filev

As the founder and CEO of Wrike, Andrew Filev is the visionary behind the unique social project management mix that has become an irreplaceable collaboration solution for thousands of customers. As a successful software entrepreneur and experienced project manager, Andrew not only oversees the company’s business strategy, but passionately leads the product management.

Prior to Wrike, Andrew Filev launched his first software development venture at the age of 17. Growing it into an international business with more than 100 engineers, he faced the same collaboration challenges that millions of companies struggle with frequently. Looking for efficient solutions, he came up with his own idea of a collaboration platform for dynamic distributed teams, running several simultaneous projects, just like his team. “Traditional software didn’t work for my team, and we weren’t alone in this. We needed a better alternative — a tool that would help connect data across multiple projects, would give a crystal-clear overview of these projects to managers and would become one hub for smooth, real-time collaboration for the whole team,” Andrew says about the origins of Wrike’s vision.

The first pillar in Andrew’s “go where data is” concept, which has become Wrike’s core, was building advanced e-mail integration to bring data from the most ubiquitous communication tools into the planning process. Further, developing Wrike as a flexible and easy-to-use system that would perfectly scale to growing teams and more data, Andrew came up with an innovative work graph model that combines the ideas from project management (work breakdown structure), operating systems (hierarchical folders), semantic web (tags) and brainstorming (mindmap) into one cohesive and simple model.

Andrew has been a contributing author in influential blogs and journals (Cutter IT Journal, Web 2.0 Journal, etc.) and has given presentations at many conferences, such as the Web 2.0 Expo, Office 2.0 Conference, PMI events and more.

To learn more about Andrew’s ideas and project management practices, you can subscribe to his Project Management 2.0 blog

GHF2014 – PL03 – Global Health Governance: Integrating Competing World Views

14:00
15:30
PL03 WEDNESDAY, 16 APRIL 2014 ROOM: 2 ICON_QA
GLOBAL HEALTH GOVERNANCE: INTEGRATING COMPETING WORLD VIEWS
MODERATOR:
Dr. Sunoor Verma
Executive Director, Geneva Health Forum, Switzerland
TENTATIVE PANEL:
Prof. Ilona Kickbush
Director, Global Health Programme, the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Switzerland
Prof. Ronald Labonté
Professor, Canada Research Chair, Globalization/Health Equity, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, Canada
Dr. Mira Shiva 
Chairperson, Health Action International Asia –Pacific, India
Mr. Pascal Lamy 
Honorary President, Notre Europe, Jacques Delors Institute, France
Mr. Bart Peterson
Honorary President, Senior Vice President, Corporate Affairs and Communications, Eli Lilly and Company, United States
AIM:
Drawing on the personal journeys of a politician, an activist and two academic experts in the field of global health governance and diplomacy, this session will aim to illustrate how effective global health advocacy not only lies in the institutional and technical assets of GHG actors but among other things in their ability to strategically frame policy issues, in order to appeal to different audiences within specific contexts and timeframes.
OUTLINE:
Many of the most pressing global challenges facing the world today are intertwined with the complex dynamics of globalization, and require policy solutions that see national and international institutions acting in concert and the need for health communities across countries to cooperate more closely, and across a wider range of issues. The question, of how we should collectively protect and promote health in an increasingly globalized world, has opened up the policy space known as global health governance (GHG).The starting point of this session is the recognition that GHG space is inherently a political space, not limited to technical solutions based on 'best practice', cost effectiveness or evidence, but  a political arena characterized by competing frames, each with its own logic, language and preferred policy pathways. This creates a complex and contested policy space where different frames (with the worldviews and interests they represent) compete.
PROFILES:

Sunoor -130Dr. Sunoor Verma

Dr. Sunoor Verma is the Executive Director Geneva Health Forum.As a senior development expert, Sunoor Verma has worked in emergency, conflict and post-conflict situations. He has led the establishment of complex partnerships and coalitions by negotiating strategic agreements and their implementation plans. He has set up programs across sectors, including, Education, Health, Protection, Injuries, Sanitation, HIV/AIDS, Harm Reduction, Conflict Resolution, Refugees, Internally Displaced Persons, Environment, Culture, Gender, Minority issues etc. He has worked in various locations, including Western Europe, South East Europe, South Asia, South East Asia, North Africa and Australia. Among others, he consulted and worked with UNHCR, UNICEF, and the European Centre for Minority Issues, Cambridge University and the Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons. Sunoor Vema has been the principal consultant of the strategy consulting practice ‘ProCube’ and is the founder of www.csrforchildren.org.

He is a seasoned speaker on the topics of strategy, partnerships and leadership. He is also sought after for his skills as an effective moderator on high-voltage panels. In a previous avatar, Sunoor Verma was a practicing cardiothoracic surgeon.

 

PascalLamyMr. Pascal Lamy

Perspective: How to engage in dialogue with various actors who have differing interests and power positions while safeguarding public good interests?

Mr. Pascal Lamy has served two terms as Director-General of the World Trade Organization (WTO) from September 2005 to September 2013. He holds degrees from the Paris based Ecole des Hautes Etudes Commerciales (HEC), from the Institut d’Etudes Politiques (IEP) and from the Ecole Nationale d’Administration (ENA). He began his career in the French civil service at the Inspection Générale des finances and at the Treasury. He then became an advisor to the Finance Minister Jacques Delors, and subsequently to Prime Minister Pierre Mauroy. In Brussels from 1985 to 1994, he was Chief of Staff for the President of the European Commission, Jacques Delors, and his representative as Sherpa in the G7. In November 1994, he joined the team in charge of rescuing Crédit Lyonnais, and later became CEO of the bank until its privatisation in 1999. Between 1999 and 2004, he was Commissioner for Trade at the European Commission under Romano Prodi. After his tenure in Brussels, he spent a short sabbatical period as President of “Notre Europe”, a think tank working on European integration, as associate Professor at the l’Institut d’Etudes Politiques in Paris and as advisor to Poul Nyrup Rasmussen (President of the European Socialist Party). More recently, Pascal Lamy was the chair of the Oxford Martin Commission for Future Generations, a commission that brought together highly experienced leaders from government, business and society to examine the current gridlock in international and national attempts to deal with key global problems. The Commission has issued recommendations in a report entitled “Now for the Long Term” made public in October 2013.

 

Ronald_LabontéProf. Ronald Labonté

Perspective: How global health as a foreign policy issue is conceptualized, framed? And why is it important to study it?

Prof. Labonté is Canada Research Chair in Globalization and Health Equity at the Institute of Population Health, and Professor in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa. His current research interests include globalization as a ‘determinant of determinants’ (he chaired the Globalization Knowledge Network for the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health); ethics, human rights and global health development; global migration of health workers; revitalization of comprehensive primary health care; global health diplomacy.

He recently reviewed the various policy frames (security, development, global public goods, trade, human rights and ethical/moral reasoning) for health in foreign policy that inform global health diplomacy.

 

Ilona KickbushProf. Ilona Kickbusch, Switzerland

Perspective: What is global health diplomacy and why is it important to build capacity in this domain?

Ilona Kickbusch is the Director of the Global Health Programme at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva. She advises organisations, government agencies and the private sector on policies and strategies to promote health at the national, European and international level. She has published widely and is a member of a number of advisory boards in both the academic and the health policy arena. She has received many awards and served as the Adelaide Thinker in Residence at the invitation of the Premier of South Australia. She has recently launched a think-tank initiative “Global Health Europe: A Platform for European Engagement in Global Health” and the “Consortium for Global Health Diplomacy”.

Her key areas of interest are global health governance, global health diplomacy, health in all policies, the health society and health literacy. She has had a distinguished career with the World Health Organization, at both the regional and global level, where she initiated the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and a range of “settings projects” including Healthy Cities. From 1998 – 2003 she joined Yale University as the head of the global health division, where she contributed to shaping the field of global health and headed a major Fulbright programme. She is a political scientist with a PhD from the University of Konstanz, Germany.

 

MiraShiva200x150Dr. Mira Shiva, India

Perspective: Mobilizing local communities and raising the voices of the women.

Dr. Mira Shiva is a physician and health activist (MBBS, MD Medicine, Christian Medical College, Ludhiana, India). She has been working on issues related to public health, women’s health, reproductive health & gender concerns, women ecology & health, food & nutritional security, health rights rooted in social justice & gender justice.

She is the Coordinator, Initiative for Health & Equity in Society/Third World Network, Founder Member & Steering Committee member of Diverse Women for Diversity, Peoples’ Health Movement, Health Action International-Asia Pacific, South Asian Focal Point-International Peoples’ Health Council.

She is member working Group Regulation of Food & Drugs by Planning Commission for 12th 5 year plan.She was member Central Council for Health, and  Chairperson of the Consumer Education Taskforce on Safety of Food & Medicine, Ministry of Health. She has been Member Health Committee National Human Rights Commission, Member, Central Social Welfare Board, Member-Advisory Committee, Gender and Communication Programme for Vigyan Prasar-Department of Science and Technology.

She was Director-Women & Health, Rational Drug Policy Head Public Policy in VHAI, Founder Coordinator All India Drug Action Network. She is steering Committee Member of Indian alliance of Child Righs & National alliance for Maternal Health & Human Rights, Right To Food Campaign, Doctors for Food & Biosafety.

She was involved in relief work following the Bhopal gas Tragedy 1984, was member of Supreme Court of India and member of the Commission that  investigated the causes of a cholera outbreak trans Jamuna, part of Delhi in 1988.

 

BartPetersonSMMr. Bart Peterson, United States

Mr. Bart Peterson joined Eli Lilly and Company in June 2009 as senior vice president of corporate affairs and communications. He is a member of the company’s executive committee.

Peterson received a bachelor’s degree from Purdue University in 1980 and earned his law degree at the University of Michigan in 1983.Prior to joining Lilly, Peterson was Managing Director at Strategic Capital Partners, LLC from June2008 to June 2009. During spring 2008, Peterson was a fellow with the Institute of Politics of Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. During the 2008-2009 school year, Peterson was a Distinguished Visiting Professor of Public Policy at Ball State University. He continues as a fellow with the University’s Bowen Center for Public Affairs.

From 2000 to 2007, Peterson served two terms as Mayor of Indianapolis, the nation’s 12th largest city. He also served as President of the National League of Cities in 2007. As mayor, Peterson led a transformation of public education in Indianapolis as the only mayor in America with the authority to create new schools by issuing charters. He was responsible for 16 charter schools and won Harvard University’s prestigious Innovations in American Government Award for the initiative in 2006. He was also instrumental in the business expansions of FedEx, Rolls Royce, and WellPoint in Indianapolis, and the construction and development of major projects such as Lucas Oil Stadium, the Conrad Indianapolis, Simon Property Group’s world headquarters, the new Indianapolis International Airport’s Col. H. Weir Cook terminal building, and the future Indiana Convention Center expansion and J.W. Marriott Hotel.

Along with Indiana University, Purdue University, Lilly, and the Central Indiana Corporate

Partnership, he created BioCrossroads, a focused effort to push Indianapolis to the forefront   as a life sciences capital. Peterson was honored by the National Association of Clean Water Agencies with their city government leader of the year award for his efforts in cleaning up the Indianapolis waterways.

GHF2014 – PS30 – Debate Motion: “This house believes reverse innovation in health is a distinct category of innovation that holds the key to creating effective future health solutions.”

10:45
12:15
PS30 WEDNESDAY, 16 APRIL 2014 ROOM: 3
ICON_Debate
Debate Motion: “This house believes reverse innovation in health is a distinct category of innovation that holds the key to creating effective future health solutions.”
MODERATOR:
Dr. Greg Martin
Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Globalization and Health, Ireland
FOR THE MOTION:
Dr. Shams B. Syed
Program Manager, African Partnerships for Patient Safety (APPS), Global Partnerships Lead, WHO Service Delivery & Safety (SDS), Switzerland
Ms. Vivasvat Dadwal
Senior Fellow at the University of Ottawa, Centre on Governance, Canada
AGAINST THE MOTION:
Mrs. Bronwyn Lay
Writer, Jurist, Australia
Dr. Sunoor Verma
Executive Director, Geneva Health Forum, Switzerland
PROFILES:

photo greg martinDr. Greg Martin
Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Globalization and Health, Ireland

Dr. Greg Martin is a South African doctor with a masters in public health and an MBA degree. Dr Martin’s involvement in global health has spanned a wide rang of subject matter including maternal and child health, cancer prevention, access to medicine and the treatment and care of people living with HIV, amongst others. He recently stepped down from the role of Director of Elimination of Mother to Child Transmission at the Clinton Health Access Initiative in order to move to Ireland where he recently got married. He is currently with Editor-in-Chief of the journal Globalization and Health and runs a Global Health YouTube channel as well as working as a clinician in a local hospital in Dublin.

 

ShamsSyedIMG_2475Dr. Shams B. Syed, Program Manager, African Partnerships for Patient Safety (APPS), Global Partnerships Lead, WHO Service Delivery & Safety (SDS), Switzerland

Dr. Shams Syed is responsible for overseeing African Partnerships for Patient Safety (APPS), based at WHO Headquarters in Geneva. He has led the development and implementation of the programme since its inception in 2008. He assumed responsibility for global partnership development in the newly formed WHO Department of Service Delivery & Safety in 2013. Dr. Syed received his medical degree from St. George’s, University of London, and subsequently practiced as an independent General Practitioner in the UK. He received postgraduate public health training at the University of Cambridge. Subsequently, he trained in Preventive Medicine at Johns Hopkins University, is US Board Certified in Public Health & Preventive Medicine and a Fellow of the American College of Preventive Medicine. His previous experiences include: involvement in a future-focused multi-country health systems research consortium; working at the Pan American Health Organization with seven Caribbean countries on strengthening health systems with a focus on surveillance systems; and working as the Advisor on Family and Community Health at the WHO Country Office in Trinidad and Tobago with a focus on quality of care. Dr. Syed has a focused academic interest in reverse innovation in global health systems.

 

PS03_Vivasvat_DadwalMs. Vivasvat Dadwal

Viva is a civil servant by day, community-builder by night. Viva's multidisciplinary interests span local, national, and international spheres. She is engaged in a range of socially and politically minded activities - from Canadian history to global health. She is a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre on Governance at the University of Ottawa and Associate Editor of the London School of Economics-affiliated journal Globalization and Health. She has held prestigious internships at the World Health Organization and Permanent Mission of Canada to the United Nations and to the World Trade Organization in Geneva. She is also a guest blogger for World Bank's youth blog, Youthink! Viva holds a B.Sc. (Hons) in Biology from the University of Windsor, and an M.A. in Public and International Affairs from the University of Ottawa.

 

Sunoor -130Dr. Sunoor Verma
Executive Director, Geneva Health Forum, Switzerland

Dr. Sunoor Verma is the Executive Director Geneva Health Forum.As a senior development expert, Sunoor Verma has worked in emergency, conflict and post-conflict situations. He has led the establishment of complex partnerships and coalitions by negotiating strategic agreements and their implementation plans. He has set up programs across sectors, including, Education, Health, Protection, Injuries, Sanitation, HIV/AIDS, Harm Reduction, Conflict Resolution, Refugees, Internally Displaced Persons, Environment, Culture, Gender, Minority issues etc. He has worked in various locations, including Western Europe, South East Europe, South Asia, South East Asia, North Africa and Australia. Among others, he consulted and worked with UNHCR, UNICEF, and the European Centre for Minority Issues, Cambridge University and the Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons. Sunoor Vema has been the principal consultant of the strategy consulting practice ‘ProCube’ and is the founder of www.csrforchildren.org.

He is a seasoned speaker on the topics of strategy, partnerships and leadership. He is also sought after for his skills as an effective moderator on high-voltage panels. In a previous avatar, Sunoor Verma was a practicing cardiothoracic surgeon.

 

PS30_Lay Profile PhotoMrs. Bronwyn Lay

Bronwyn Lay currently lives with her family in rural France near the Swiss border.

Before moving overseas, Bronwyn worked as a legal aid lawyer in Melbourne, obtained post-graduate qualifications in political theory and was involved with various community organisations.

She now spends her time writing and pondering the world from the safety of her vegetable patch.

 

GHF2014 – PS25 – Raising Awareness and Promoting Healthy Lifestyles: the Proof is in the Pudding

16:00
17:30
PS25 WEDNESDAY, 16 APRIL 2014 ROOM: 13
ICON_Fishbowl
Raising Awareness and Promoting Healthy Lifestyles:
the Proof is in the Pudding

MODERATOR:
Dr. Sunoor Verma
Executive Director, Geneva Health Forum, Switzerland
SPEAKERS:
FitNation/SémioFormation: Signs of Bikes for Public Health
Mr. Rick Bell
Executive Director, American Institute of Architects New York Chapter, Center for Architecture, United States
Ms. Gwenaëlle de Kerret
Research Director and Semiotician, Harris Interactive,
PhD. Candidate in socio-semiotics, Adjunct teacher in La Sorbonne (Paris V) and Rouen International Business School (NEOMA), France
Intervention with Communication Techniques Reduce Tobacco Use in the Community: An Experience from Rural Bangladesh
Mr. Shahidul Hoque
Field Research Manager, Centre for Equity and Health Systems, ICDDR, Bangladesh
Take a Step for Diabetes
Mr. Lorenzo Piemonte
Communications Coordinator, External Relations, International Diabetes Federation, Belgium
OUTLINE:
PROFILES:

Sunoor -130Dr. Sunoor Verma

Dr. Sunoor Verma is the Executive Director Geneva Health Forum.As a senior development expert, Sunoor Verma has worked in emergency, conflict and post-conflict situations. He has led the establishment of complex partnerships and coalitions by negotiating strategic agreements and their implementation plans. He has set up programs across sectors, including, Education, Health, Protection, Injuries, Sanitation, HIV/AIDS, Harm Reduction, Conflict Resolution, Refugees, Internally Displaced Persons, Environment, Culture, Gender, Minority issues etc. He has worked in various locations, including Western Europe, South East Europe, South Asia, South East Asia, North Africa and Australia. Among others, he consulted and worked with UNHCR, UNICEF, and the European Centre for Minority Issues, Cambridge University and the Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons. Sunoor Vema has been the principal consultant of the strategy consulting practice ‘ProCube’ and is the founder of www.csrforchildren.org.

He is a seasoned speaker on the topics of strategy, partnerships and leadership. He is also sought after for his skills as an effective moderator on high-voltage panels. In a previous avatar, Sunoor Verma was a practicing cardiothoracic surgeon.

PS25_Rick Bell_squareMr. Rick Bell

I became an architect because of the inspirational oratory of professors including Vincent Scully and the physical example of buildings seen while attempting, at the age of 19, to hitchhike from Paris to Dakar. As an architect I've had three careers, first in the private sector, then at a public agency, and, most recently, in the not-for-profit domain. As a private architect, I mostly designed schools and libraries in a NYC-based firm that also did hotel projects worldwide. In the public sector, I served as chief architect and assistant commissioner of New York City's public works department, responsible for 700 projects annually. And for the last twelve years I've led the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects and created its storefront Center for Architecture.

Gwen profile photoMs. Gwenaëlle de Kerret

Gwenaëlle joined Harris Interactive France in 2007, where she is responsible for semiotic and ethno-semiotic research. She has been working in marketing and communication research for 8 years, on French and international topics. She specializes in projects aiming at understanding how corporations’ territory impact on public’s perceptions. These projects involve either services and cultural products, or consumer goods (packagings, products) and commercial spaces.

In parallel, she has been working for 3 years on a PhD dissertation dedicated to museums’ visual identity, in Paris and NYC. This research focuses on how museums express their identity through graphics and space (communication, architecture, signage, etc.).

PS25_Piemonte Profile Photo_squareMr. Lorenzo Piemonte

An Italian national with a background in international relations, I’ve been based in Brussels for the last fifteen years, following periods of work and study in South Africa, the USA and UK. I joined the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in 2003 and have been involved in several activities and projects for the Federation since then, including advocacy, communications, event management and public relations. My current responsibilities include coordination of the World Diabetes Day awareness campaign and overseeing the online communications of IDF. I’ve been living with type 1 diabetes for over 20 years.

GHF2014 – PS13 – Integrated Approaches to HIV Management

16:00
17:30
PS13 TUESDAY, 15 APRIL 2014 ROOM: 15 ICON_Fishbowl
Integrated Approaches to HIV Management
MODERATOR:
Dr. Alexandra Calmy, Head, Unit of HIV/AIDS, Division of Infectious Diseases, Geneva University Hospitals, Switzerland
SPEAKERS:
Integrating HIV Commodity Supply Chains for Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission Scale Up in Nigeria
Ms. Chioma Nwuba, Logistics Advisor, HIV/AIDS Program Management, HIV/AIDS Supply Chain Management Systems, John Snow Inc., Nigeria
Administrative Integration of HIV Monitoring And Evaluation: A Case Study From South Africa
Dr. Mary Kawonga, Senior Specialist /Lecturer, Department of Community Health, Wits School of Public Health, South Africa
Ms. Shona Wynd, Expert on Community Health Care Workers, UNAIDS, Switzerland
OUTLINE:
Eighteen years after the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy, 10 years after antiretroviral therapy massive roll-out in high prevalence countries, the success of HIV treatment have been confirmed everywhere, worldwide. Most national programs however are fragmented. For example, mother to child transmission services are not necessarily linked with ART adult delivery systems, TB screening, diagnosis and treatment services are disconnected from HIV services in most TB/HIV high prevalence countries etc. Civil society, communities and patient-centred care have been central to the AIDS response from the outset and will continue to be essential to scaling up the response.  We will aim to explore how HIV services can form a continuum of care and address challenges around improving integrated service delivery as we move towards achieving the 3 Zeros (zero new deaths due to AIDS, zero new infections and zero discrimination) and UHC.
PROFILES:

Alexandra_CalmyDr. Alexandra Calmy

Dr. Alexandra Calmy is a medical doctor, trained in internal medicine and in Infectious diseases (FMH), and holds a PhD in clinical research PhD in HIV/AIDS obtained in Sydney, Australia (Prof Andrew Carr, 2005-2008). She is currently an associate Professor and head of the HIV/AIDS Unit in Geneva University Hospital.

Dr. Calmy’s research interest is in the public health and humanitarian response to HIV/AIDS, specifically the provision of antiretroviral therapy and management of side effects in resource limited settings. She has worked  as a medical doctor with Médecins Sans Frontières in Cambodia in 1996 and has subsequently supported MSF’s HIV/AIDS work for more than 10 years.

She is a member of WHO working groups on the writing and the implementation of guidelines related to the treatment of HIV in developing countries since 2001, head of CSS6 committee at the “Agence National de Recherche sur le SIDA” (ANRS), member of the scientific board of the Swiss HIV Study Cohort (SHCS), and the Federal commission of Sexual Health in Switzerland. She is also a reviewer for numerous well recognised medical journals and has published over 100 articles in peer-reviewed medical journals.
PS13_NwubaMs. Chioma Nwuba

Chioma Nwuba is a Logistics Advisor - HIV/AIDS Program Management at John Snow Incorporated. She implements programs in West Africa aimed at strengthening health systems, preventing mother to child transmission of HIV and development of indigenous capacity to support HIV/TB prevention, care, treatment and commodity supply chain management.

She is currently studying online for a Masters in Public Health degree at the Texila American University, Guyana, South America.

Kawongs Profile PhotoDr. Mary Kawonga

Dr. Mary Kawonga was born and raised in Zambia, completed her medical degree there and practiced for a few years before she decided to move to South Africa. She moved to South Africa soon after that country’s first democratic elections in 1994, and looked forward to new and exciting possibilities in the ‘new’ South Africa. After practicing as a clinician in public sector hospitals she decided to pursue a career in community medicine rather than paediatrics and enrolled in a residency programme in community medicine at the University of Natal in the beautiful coastal city of Durban. On completing her four year residency programme in 2000, she moved to the less beautiful city of Johannesburg where she has since lived and worked as a community medicine specialist. In her current position Dr. Kawonga wears two hats. The first is as a public health medicine consultant with the provincial health department providing technical support to health managers on policy implementation and planning and monitoring health services and programmes. The second is as a lecturer with the University of the Witwatersrand School of Public Health involved in undergraduate and postgraduate teaching and supervision, and research. She is currently enrolled for a PhD at her university. Her doctoral thesis explores methods for measuring tensions and synergies between disease-specific programmes and health systems at sub-national level.

GHF2014 – PS02 – Integrated Management of Childhood Illness: Where Do We Stand?

10:45
12:15
PS02 TUESDAY, 15 APRIL 2014 ROOM: LEMAN ICON_Fishbowl
Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses:
Where Do We Stand?

MODERATOR:
Dr. Lulu Muhe, Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health (MCA), World Health Organization, Switzerland
SPEAKERS:
Performance of Community Health Workers in Community Case Management: Uganda
Dr. Agnes Nanyonjo, Research Officer-Public Health, Malaria Consortium Uganda Technical Country Office, Uganda
Dr. Eric A. F. Simões, Professor of Paediatrics, School of Medicine, Department of Paediatrics University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, United States
OUTLINE:
The aim of the IMCI strategy introduced in 1996 was to contribute to the reduction of child mortality through appropriate management of major causes of child death including pneumonia, diarrhoea, malaria and malnutrition, improved caregiver knowledge and home care practices during illness, and prevention of illness. As we approach the 2015, what has been the contribution of IMCI in the global progress towards achieving MDG 4. Is the IMCI model still fit for purpose in addressing child survival and the emerging epidemic of non-communicable diseases beyond the 2015?
PROFILES:

Nanyonjo Profile PhotoDr. Agnes Nanyonjo

Dr. Nanyonjo is a Research officer-Public Health working with Malaria consortium Uganda. She completed her undergraduate studies from Makerere university Uganda with a bachelor of medicine and bachelor of surgery degree. She specialized in public health from Umeå university Sweden. She is a doctoral student at Karolinska institute.  She has experience working community case management of childhood diseases, HIV/AIDS and sexual and reproductive health of young people.

Eric_Simoes_squareDr. Eric A. F. Simões

Eric Simoes is a Professor of Paediatrics at the School of Medicine Department of Paediatrics University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

Eric A. F. Simoes, MB, BS, DCH, MD, earned his medical degree from the University of Madras, India, in 1984. He completed paediatric infectious diseases fellowship training at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in 1989, at which time he joined the faculty of the Department of Paediatrics and Children's Hospital Colorado. From 1995 to 1999, he directed the Paediatric Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program. Since 2001 he also has had an appointment as Professor of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and Tropical Child Health with the Department of Paediatrics, Obstetrics, and Gynaecology at the Imperial College of Science and Technology in London, UK.

Eric Simoes has published over 170 journal articles, books, book chapters, scholarly reviews, and abstracts. He is widely sought as a speaker, teacher, and consultant, both nationally and abroad. Worked as a Member, Advisory Committee on Acute Respiratory Infections, World Health Organization 1999-2004

Dr. Sunoor Verma

Dr. Sunoor Verma is the Executive Director Geneva Health Forum.As a senior development expert, Sunoor Verma has worked in emergency, conflict and post-conflict situations. He has led the establishment of complex partnerships and coalitions by negotiating strategic agreements and their implementation plans. He has set up programs across sectors, including, Education, Health, Protection, Injuries, Sanitation, HIV/AIDS, Harm Reduction, Conflict Resolution, Refugees, Internally Displaced Persons, Environment, Culture, Gender, Minority issues etc. He has worked in various locations, including Western Europe, South East Europe, South Asia, South East Asia, North Africa and Australia. Among others, he consulted and worked with UNHCR, UNICEF, and the European Centre for Minority Issues, Cambridge University and the Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons. Sunoor Vema has been the principal consultant of the strategy consulting practice 'ProCube' and is the founder of www.csrforchildren.org.

He is a seasoned speaker on the topics of strategy, partnerships and leadership. He is also sought after for his skills as an effective moderator on high-voltage panels. In a previous avatar, Sunoor Verma was a practicing cardiothoracic surgeon.

Administrative Integration of HIV Monitoring And Evaluation: A Case Study From South Africa.

Author(s) Mary Kawonga1, Sharon Fonn2, Duane Blaauw3.
Affiliation(s) 1Department of Community Health, Wits School of Public Health, Johannesburg, South Africa, 2School of Public Health, Wits School of Public Health, Johannesburg, South Africa, 3Centre for Health Policy, Wits School of Public Health, Johannesburg, South Africa.
Country - ies of focus South Africa
Relevant to the conference tracks Health Systems
Summary With increasing global focus on the integration of vertical programmes within health systems, methods are needed to analyse whether general health service (horizontal) managers at district level exercise administrative authority over disease programmes (administrative integration). This study adapts "decision space" analysis to measure administrative integration of HIV programme monitoring and evaluation (M&E). The study shows that horizontal managers exercise high degrees of authority in producing HIV information but not in using it for decisions, while vertical managers use HIV information but in silos. The lack of M&E integration may undermine district health system strengthening aims.
Background In South Africa, integration is a health sector reform priority, while several vertical programmes exist, notably for HIV, tuberculosis (TB), and maternal and child health (MCH). Historically a national HIV/AIDS directorate and specialist HIV managers have vertically managed the HIV programme and HIV programme managers account for ear-marked HIV programme funding through dedicated parallel reporting mechanisms. This is at odds with current health sector decentralisation reforms that envisage integrated management of health services under the control of generalist (horizontal) managers at a decentralised district level. National health policy envisions health districts as the foundation of the national health system.
Objectives If health districts are to be the foundation of the health system as envisaged, then horizontal district managers would need to be allocated and to exercise authority over district health services, including disease-specific interventions (i.e. administrative integration). This study examines whether this is happening in the South African health system. We use the HIV programme as a case study given its traditionally vertical approach, and focus on the M&E (information) function as a tracer for analysing administrative integration. The research aims are to:
1. Describe the extent to which horizontal managers exercise authority over HIV M&E coordination.
2. Explore factors associated with exercised authority.
Methodology The research explores two hypotheses: a) vertical managers exercise higher degrees of authority than horizontal managers in administering HIV M&E; and higher management capacity and HIV M&E knowledge are associated with higher degrees of exercised authority. This cross-sectional study was conducted in two of South Africa’s nine provinces. Fifty one participants were interviewed including: a) managers primarily responsible for general health services or general health information (horizontal manager) and b) those responsible for vertical services or information (vertical manager). HIV M&E was defined as the production of HIV information (HIV data collection, collation, analysis) and use of HIV information for decisions.In the absence of existing methods for measuring 'exercised authority' over vertical programmes, Bossert's decision-space’ approach provided a useful frame. Since decision-space analysis has not been applied to either the M&E function or in the context of programme integration, it was adapted to measure ‘exercised (administrative) authority’ in this study. We defined exercised authority as a manager undertakes tasks to oversee HIV data collection, collation and analysis, and uses HIV data to review the programme and take action. To measure this, we first identified the M&E tasks that managers were expected to perform within each M&E domain (collection, collation, analysis, use) and then administered a semi-structured questionnaire to collect data on participants’ performance of these tasks. We developed four sub-scales to measure the degree of exercised authority for each M&E domain. Sub-scales comprised several items (M&E tasks), which we coded ‘no’ if a respondent did not perform the task (score zero) or ‘yes’ if s/he did. We computed an ordinal dependent variable for each HIV M&E domain and coded observed scores as ‘low’, ‘medium’, and ‘high’. We performed ordinal logistic regression to explore whether explanatory variables (actor type [horizontal or vertical], health system level, highest, qualification, duration of management experience, management capacity score, and M&E knowledge score) were predictive of higher degrees of exercised authority.
Results More than 75% of participants were female, with an undergraduate degree or higher, and had some management
training. Participant characteristics were similar between vertical and horizontal managers. Horizontal managers attained higher mean scores for HIV data collection.
Conclusion In light of the increasing focus on health system strengthening and integration, our research makes a contribution
by providing a method and scales for measuring and monitoring administrative integration. We anticipate that
these scales will be strengthened further by empirical testing on larger samples and varied settings. In applying this
method to South Africa’s public sector HIV programme, we find that HIV M&E coordination is generally not administratively integrated, characterised by horizontal managers exercising little authority in using HIV data, and vertical managers using HIV data in sub-programme silos. We argue that this programme model potentially undermines South Africa's policy aims of integrated management of district health services under the authority of horizontal general health service managers. The research also indicates that plans for integrating the HIV programme within the health system at decentralised district level should include investments in strategies to equip horizontal managers with the knowledge and skills to use programme data for decision-making.

Institutional Complexity as a Challenge for a Coherent HIV Control Policy: Brussels.

Author(s) Christoph Schweikardt1, Yves Coppieters2.
Affiliation(s) 1School of Public Health, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium, 2School of Public Health, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
Country - ies of focus Belgium
Relevant to the conference tracks Infectious Diseases
Summary The Brussels Region is an example of the challenges in implementing global principles in the fight against HIV/AIDS locally. This is due to divided legal competencies between the Federal and the Federate (Communities, Regions) level resulting a complex legal and administrative structure and multiple coordination processes between governments. Growing Federal government commitment led to the preparation of a national plan HIV/AIDS which provides an opportunity to pass from confirmatory legislation to a new agreed HIV/AIDS action framework.
Background According to the Belgian Scientific Institute for Public Health (WIV-ISP), more than one third of HIV positive persons in Belgium, of whom the residence was known at the time of diagnosis, reside in the Brussels Region. In April 2004, the "Consultation on Harmonization of International AIDS Funding" recommended three general principles in the fight against HIV/AIDS. The first is an agreed AIDS action framework that provides the basis for coordinating the work of all partners, the second a national AIDS coordinating authority, with a broad-based multisectoral mandate; and thirdly an agreed country-level monitoring and evaluation system. The implementation of these principles poses serious challenges to countries with a complex distribution of legal competencies in health care such as Belgium. In Belgium, health care competencies are divided between the Federal level (treatment) and the sub-national Federate entities, the Regions and the Communities (prevention, health promotion). The Flemish and the French Communities exercise their legal competences concurrently in the Brussels Region, thereby increasing institutional complexity in Brussels. Furthermore, Federal legislation cannot overrule the legislation of the Communities and the Regions in their respective areas of competence.
Objectives The aim of this study is to describe the consequences of institutional complexity with regard to the different governments which are influential within the territory of the Brussels Region in the fight against HIV/AIDS and the role of Federal government as a key actor in this regard.
Methodology In order to elicit the cooperation between the different governments and the role of the Federal government, government publications and documents relating to HIV/AIDS prevention and control, such as policy statements and reports (Federal, Communities, Regions), the documentation of parliamentary debates and published personal statements of representatives were assessed, complemented by participation in the sub-workgroup "Test and treat" of the Belgian National Plan HIV/AIDS and also subsequent informal conversations with experts were carried out.
Results The legal competence of the Communities in the field of prevention led to cooperation arrangements with different parts of the Brussels government according to their competence of the Dutch- and French-language institutions, respectively. Federal government commitment increased since 2006 by:(1) taking over the financing of free and anonymous HIV testing from Doctors Without Borders (Médecins Sans Frontières, MSF) in Brussels after their decision to withdraw. This resulted in a Federal pilot programme of anonymous and free testing for the three Regions (Flanders, Wallonia, Brussels) in 2006 and subsequent legislation with the royal decree of December 28, 2006 as the initiating key document.

(2) taking the initiative for the National Plan HIV/AIDS by negotiating support from the Federate entities in the inter-ministerial conference in 2012 and chairing its preparation until the following year. Experts and workers in the field from all Regions were appointed to workgroups / sub-workgroups on prevention, screening, and care of HIV-infected persons in order to work out recommendations by June 2013. These were taken up by the Federal government in order to negotiate potential future actions with the Federate entities before publishing the plan.

Conclusion The experience of the Brussels governments indicates that institutional complexity is unlikely to be reduced in the short run.  The limits of civil society engagement concerning HIV testing in Brussels prompted Federal government into action. The National Plan HIV/AIDS provides an opportunity for a new agreed AIDS action framework and for passing from confirmatory to pro-active legislation. In this regard, the strong point of the approach of Federal government was that it chose a step by step approach that involved decision-making bodies and practitioners in order to obtain as high a commitment as possible. The process shows how a government can exploit its scope of action notwithstanding legislative limitations and institutional complexity.

Identifying and addressing structural quality gaps in primary health care in Tanzania

Author(s) Dominick Mboya1, Flora Kessy2, Christopher Mshana3, Alexander Schulze 4, Christian Lengeler 5
Affiliation(s) 1Research, Ifakara Health Institute, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 2Dar es Salaam Campus College, Mzumbe University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 3Research, Ifakara Health Institute, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 4Novartis Foundation for Sustainable Development, Novartis Company, Basel, Switzerland, 5Health Interventions Unit, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland.
Country - ies of focus Tanzania
Relevant to the conference tracks Advocacy and Communication
Summary The abstract presents the findings from assessments that used an electronic Tool to Improve Quality of Health Care (e-TIQH) within regular supportive supervision of primary health care facilities in Tanzania. The e-TIQH uses a comprehensive approach to assess the quality of primary healthcare provision at facility level, disseminates the results, and uses the results for evidence-based planning and budgeting. Improvements in some indicators are attributed both to targeted interventions after the assessments and proper planning and budgeting at district level. The tool has huge potential for scaling up by informing the planning process and making resource allocation more efficient.
Background Regular supportive supervision is a crucial element to improving the performance and quality of health facilities. To make supervision more effective, a situation analysis needs to be conducted and identified problems need to be discussed and addressed with all involved. In order to facilitate this process, an electronic Tool to Improve Quality of Health Care (e-TIQH) was introduced on a pilot basis in the Kilombero and Ulanga Districts, Morogoro Region in Tanzania. This assessment tool uses a performance based approach to identify and address the quality gaps in health facilities (mainly primary health care) in a comprehensive manner. The focus lies on primary healthcare since this is the entry point into the formal health system for most patients. Moreover, most health conditions are managed at this level. The services available at health facilities are compared with the expectations on these services, as defined by the national standards of care and community preferences. The e-TIQH approach has recently been scaled up to seven additional councils in the country (Kilosa, Gairo, Rufiji, Bagamoyo, Iringa Municipal, Mvomero and Morogoro Rural) covering 420 health facilities.
Objectives The electronic Tool to Improve Quality of Health Care (e-TIQH) was introduced with the objective of making supportive supervision of primary health care services more manageable, efficient and sustainable through reducing time and costs and by removing technical challenges in entering, cleaning and analyzing the collected data.
Methodology e-TIQH is embedded in a comprehensive approach that is to be applied in the frame of supportive supervision activities at district level. This approach is comprised of three steps:
• Assessing the quality of primary healthcare provision at facility level
• Disseminating the results of the assessments including identified quality gaps, root causes and improvements to both healthcare providers and district health authorities
• Evidence-based planning and budgeting according to the assessment findings. A comprehensive assessment of the quality of health care provision in all health facilities in the project districts is done annually. The tool assesses performance in six areas:(1) physical environment and equipment, (2) job expectations, (3) professional knowledge and skills, (4) management and administration of the facility, (5) staff motivation and (6) clients’ satisfaction. After data entry at the facility, the data are uploaded via an internet connection, and the backend of the tool generates automatically statistical reports based on predefined, standardized data analysis. This also means that the results are immediately available and easily accessible to allow for timely feedback to providers and health system managers. The following results can be viewed by health facility, district or region:
• Each of the six quality dimensions
• Disease specific care (TB, HIV/AIDS, fever (malaria) in adults, Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI) and maternal health
• Ownership category of health facilities (faith-based, public, private or institutional)
• Historical trends.The main results of each assessment round are disseminated among the healthcare providers and district health authorities. Moreover, they are used as a basis for evidence-based planning and budgeting of health interventions in the district through the so-called Comprehensive Council Health Plans (CCHPs).
Results At baseline, weak performance prevailed with regard to staff motivation, job expectations, and professional knowledge, skills and attitudes of health care personnel. Shortage of trained staff, lack of essential equipment and non-adherence to basic principles of infection prevention and control measures were important issues across all districts. Similarly, low performance prevailed with regard to management of TB/HIV across all districts. A comparison of the baseline and follow-up assessments in Kilombero and Ulanga Districts showed quick improvements in job expectations and professional knowledge skills and attitudes as a result of targeted on-the-job training and supply of treatment guidelines to health facilities. The results indicate that districts can reach scores of 80% or beyond. However, it seems rather hard for the districts to go higher given the limited resources at the district level and lack of qualified staff. While Kilombero and Ulanga, after 5 years of quality assessments, have reached a good level of above 75%, Kilosa/Gairo, after only two assessment rounds, still lags behind. However, the example of Kilosa/Gairo illustrates a general trend one observes in all districts so far and relatively quick improvements can be made in the quality areas of job expectations and client satisfaction. Even the most challenging dimension, staff motivation, can be improved, though on a relatively low level. Through appropriate feedback following the assessments, small changes at health facility level (e.g. provision of incentives to staff on night shift) can be rapidly initiated which results to improvement in quality of care. These changes can then lead to higher client satisfaction. Yet, most changes with regard to physical environment and staff motivation in terms of promotions and salary increment depend a lot on resources made available at district level and therefore often take more time. Professional knowledge and facility management/administration can be partially addressed through on-the-job training.In terms of disease specific care offered in the assessed primary healthcare services, results reveal that the two districts which have been benefiting from the e-TIQH exercises for a longer time have higher scores, especially for malaria/fever and TB care, but also for child and maternal healthcare. Generally, weaknesses remain with regard to HIV/AIDS and partially maternal healthcare (Rufiji, Iringa).
Conclusion e-TIQH helps to identify the major quality gaps across districts, regions and the country. For the first time it provides a realistic, structured and informed picture of the quality of health care situation, including performance in child and maternal health, malaria, HIV/AIDS and TB related care. Furthermore, it offers the opportunity for productive interactions between health system managers and health care providers. By providing immediate results and feedback to providers and health governing structures, the e-TIQH approach facilitates immediate, mid- and long term planning to address the identified gaps. Thus, it has huge potential for scaling up by informing the planning process and making resource allocation efficient in view of achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals.