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GHF2014 – PS34 – Malaria Integration in the Post-MDG Agenda

14:00
15:30
PS34 THURSDAY, 17 APRIL 2014 ROOM: MOTTA
ICON_Fishbowl
Malaria Integration in the Post-MDG Agenda
MODERATOR:
Dr. Susanna Hausmann Muela
Senior Health Advisor, Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Switzerland
SPEAKERS:
Dr. Roset Bahmanyar
Global Programme Head, Malaria and Leprocy, Novartis Foundation for Sustainable Development, Switzerland
Dr. Silvia Ferazzi
Technical Officer, Roll Back Malaria Partnership, Switzerland
Ambassador Laurence Ishengoma
Special High Level Adviser to the Minister for Lands, Housing and Human Settlements Development, United Republic of Tanzania
Dr. Flora L. Kessy
Ifakara Health Institute and Novartis Foundation, Tanzania
Dr. Jacques Mader
Regional Health Advisor, Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation
Dr. Kaspar Wyss
Head of Unit, Swiss Centre for International Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Switzerland
OUTLINE:
This session will encourage dialogue on how the global malaria community can integrate with non-health sectors to help eliminate malaria and pave the way for sustainable development. It will offer unique opportunity to discuss effective strategies to integrate with the non-health sector to ultimately free the world of malaria.
View Session Invitation Here
PROFILES:

PS34_Susanna_Hausmann_MuelaDr. Susanna Hausmann Muela

Trained as an epidemiologist and medical anthropologist, Susanna has been working over the past 20 years in Global and Public Health. She has done field work on health-seeking behaviour and social science aspects of malaria and neglected diseases.  She has published on vulnerability and access to care. Before joining SDC in 2012, she was a lecturer and senior researcher at Autonomous University of Guerrero in Mexico, where she was involved in a Dengue community engagement project. From 2003-2010, she was Deputy CEO of UBS Optimus Foundation, responsible for its Global Health Research grant strategy.  As a Founding Member of Partners of Applied Social Sciences (PASS) International, Susanna has been teaching Medical Anthropology Applied to Public Health in Antwerp and Glasgow.

Photo: Marion NitschDr. Roset Bahmanyar

Edith Roset Bahmanyar is Global Program Head, Malaria and Leprosy, at the Novartis Foundation for Sustainable Development, working with partners on projects aiming at elimination of these diseases. Edith holds a Diploma and a Doctorate in Medicine from the University of Geneva, Switzerland, with a Board Certification in obstetrics and gynecology. Edith also has a Degree in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene from the Prince Leopold II Institute of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene, Antwerp, Belgium, and a Master in Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard University, MA, USA. Prior to joining the Novartis Foundation in March 2014, Edith was Senior Medical Epidemiologist at GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines, working on large multi country studies in Africa to support the RTS,S/AS malaria vaccine development, and provided epidemiological expertise for other disease areas such as Tuberculosis, HIV, and Neglected Tropical Diseases.  Previously, Edith provided technical expertise to Ministries of Health to scale up HIV programs in sub-Saharan Africa, including in Tanzania with Centers for Diseases Control, and in Lesotho with the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation and SolidarMed.

Silvia_FerazziDr. Silvia Ferazzi

Silvia Ferazzi has been working for some 20 years in humanitarian affairs and development in the UN and WHO and in public-private partnerships.  She started her career as a social policy researcher and activist with a primary interest in health, poverty and gender. Her academic and journalistic work resulted in some 20 publications in Italian and international journals and books. Between 2006 and 2010, she led fundraising activities at the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and at the Global alliance for Improved Nutrition.

Laurence_IshengomaAmbassador Laurence Ishengoma

Ambassador Laurence Ishengoma is currently the Advisor of the Minister on matters related to water, sanitation, human settlement and environment. Previously, from 1976 to 1984, he held various management positions in the Tanzanian Government. In 1985, he was appointed Trade Counsellor in the Tanzanian Embassy in Tokyo, which subsequently launched his diplomatic career. Between 2005 and 2010, he worked for UN-HABITAT as Special Advisor, inter alia, for the Lake Victoria Water and Sanitation Programme and the Lake Tanganyika Water, Sanitation and Environment Programme, which had a major impact on the health programmes in the region. He represented the organisation in various regional group consultations, including with the Economic Communities of EAC, SADC, and COMESA.

Kessey Profile PhotoDr. Flora L. Kessy

Flora Lucas Kessy, a Senior Lecturer in Development Studies at Mzumbe University, Morogoro Tanzania holds a PhD in Agricultural and Consumer Economics with a major in Family and Consumer Economics and a minor in Women and Gender in Global Perspective from University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, USA. Dr. Kessy has researched and published on issues related to income and non-income poverty, social sectors development and good governance. In particular, she has researched on poverty reduction strategies in Eastern and Southern Africa, poverty escape routes, covariate and idiosyncratic shocks affecting households in Tanzania and social protection. In the area of governance, she is involved in public expenditure studies for the health sector and water sector and the use of evidence for actions to improve maternal and newborn health.

She has provided services to the Government of Tanzania including leading the team that drafted the second cluster (quality of life and social wellbeing) of the National Strategy for Growth and Reduction of poverty (MKUKUTA). She has also provided consultancy services to national and international organizations on on-social-economic development and project evaluation including the World Bank, Swiss Development Cooperation (SDC), UNFPA, UNICEF, DfID and Gatsby Charitable Foundation among others.

Her major community development intervention is the implementation of the access project which aimed at improving access to effective malaria treatment in two districts in Southern Tanzania using interventions designed to increase household resources for accessing health care and improving quality of health care at health facilities. She has also participated in implementing Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) action research for people living with HV and AIDS.

Wyss Profile PhotoDr. Kaspar Wyss

Kaspar Wyss is a Public Health Specialist, Associate Professor (PD) and Deputy Head of Department at the Swiss Centre for International Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute.  Kaspar Wyss has strong management and leadership experience and is in charge of a team of 15 staff focusing on health systems development primarily in low- and middle income countries. Activities relate to both research and health system monitoring and performance assessment and he directs a number of research and implementation projects in Africa, Eastern Europe, and Asia. He has further extensive consultancy experiences for a broad range of clients. For the University of Basel (MSc and medical students) and for other courses including the Swiss Inter-University Master of Public Health Program he teaches on health systems.

 

 

Dr. Marie-Claude Bottineau

PS12_Dr_Marie_BottineauDr. Marie-Claude Bottineau

Pediatrician, Neonatology, Pediatrics Intensive Care, MSF CH, Geneva, Switzerland

Dr. Bottineau is a French Pediatrician with a DESS in Neonatology, a competency in Pediatrics Intensive Care and a Master Degree in Public Health and Tropical Medicine. She did the first part of her carrier working in General and University Hospitals in France as Pediatrician in Pediatrics, Pediatrics and Neonatal Intensive Care in Nantes, Nancy, Le Havre and Paris and her Tropical Medicine Degree in Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, with Pr Gentilini and Pr Duflo. She also studied Bio-Ethics in Paris as free auditor getting an equivalence of Master Degree.

In parallel, she was doing some regular missions around the world with several Humanitarian Organizations including MSF- France in Kosovo; Vietnam (Ho-Chi-Minh); Madagascar (Antananarivo); Nicaragua (Leon and Managua), during civil war; Nepal (Pokhara-Jomoson); India (Calcutta, slums of Howrah-Pilkhana) and Cameroon (Mpoundou, Abong-Mbang district).

From 1990 to 1996, she dedicated her carrier to the humanitarian action working exclusively in expatriation in different humanitarian contexts of which in Benin with Terre Des Hommes-Lausanne and in Angola with MSF-France (Uige and Benguela provinces during civil war).

After an urgent medical repatriation in December 1995, time for recovering, few months in HQ MSF-France in Paris and few years in Robert Debré Hospital (Pediatrics Emergencies and Neonatal SMUR), she was to the United States in order to complete her Master Degree in Public Health (2000). Then, she worked 2 years as Public Health Medical Specialist at CRED (Center for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters), UCL, Brussels, Belgium. At the same time she made several missions to Cambodia for the Belgium Cooperation and some consultancies as Evaluator within the European Commission for INCO-DEV and INCO-MED programs.

From 2001 to 2003 she made regular consultancies for WHO Geneva in Switzerland (Geneva) on GAVI (Global Alliance for Vaccines & Immunizations); Chad (Tanjile), Mali (Bamako) and Indonesia (Djakarta, Bali and Iles de la Sonde) on Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination (MNTE) including Lot Quality Assurance Surveys (LQAS).

From January 2003 to July 2007 she worked as UNHCR Senior Regional Health/Nutrition/HIV – AIDS Co-ordinator for West Africa based in Sierra Leone (Freetown) and Ghana (Accra), then the Great Lakes Region based in Burundi (Bujumbura) and at least Chad – Darfour Emergency, based in Chad (Abéché).

Mid July 2007, she was appointed as Pediatrics Referent in MSF-CH to develop pediatrics vision, policy and strategic approach and to give adequate support to pediatrics fields. In April 2011, she took the coordination and leadership of the MSF International Pediatrics Working Group and early 2014 the coordination of the Mother, Neonatal and Child pool including nutrition.

She taught extensively (H.E.L.P Course, in MSF, UNHCR, Universities...) and participated actively in international congresses making some abstracts, publications, posters, and/or oral communications.

She contributed for many years to the work of Amnesty International against Torture, acting with the Medical Commission. After different professional affiliations, she is currently active member of the Target Advisory Group (TAG) of the International Pediatrics Association (IPA) on Children in Humanitarian Disasters, of the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (PMNCH) (WHO, UNICEF, Save The Children...) and of the Group of Tropical Pediatrics (Société Francaise de Pédiatrie).

She got certificates of recognition from CDC Atlanta, H.E.L.P Course and the UNAM of Nicaragua for her action in emergency settings and/or her contribution to the teaching.

GHF2014 – PS05 – Health Services Integration and Disease Control Programmes

10:45
12:15
PS05 TUESDAY, 15 APRIL 2014 ROOM: 13 ICON_Fishbowl
Health Services Integration and Disease Control Programmes
MODERATOR:
Marianne Pirard, MD
Educational Coordinator of the Public Health department, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium
SPEAKERS:
Amina Essolbi, MD, MPH,
Senior lecturer Ecole Nationale de Santé Publique, Rabat, Morocco
Basile Keugoung, MD, MPH, PhD student,
Ministry of Public Health, Yaounde, Cameroon
Raoul Bermejo, MD, MPH, PhD student,
Researcher, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, University of the Philippines College of Medicine, Philippines
OUTLINE:
There is currently a broad consensus in the global community on the need for Health Systems Strengthening (HSS) to make further progress toward the Millennium Development Goals. The recent momentum around UHC, a likely post-MDG goal, is another example of this. However, there is still divergence on how HSS should be framed and how it should be done in practice.In this session we will present three frameworks to guide HSS with applied examples from different countries. We intend to discuss the relevance of these HSS frameworks and exchange experiences in HSS with a diverse audience bringing the perspective from actors such as first line health workers, health system and disease control programme managers, decision makers, international organisations and donors working in diverse settings (LICs & MICs, different continents).
PROFILES:

Marianne Pirard
Marianne Pirard
is a medical doctor with an MPH from the Institute of Tropical Medicine (ITM), Antwerp. She currently is the Educational Coordinator of the Public Health department of ITM and is in charge of the organization of an international MPH with a track in Health Systems & Policy and a track in Disease Control.Before joining ITM in 2002, she worked for 5 years as a clinician in a rural district in Zimbabwe in a period its health system based on PHC principles was an example for the region (1986-91). She also spent 8 years in Bolivia as a Public Health physician, strengthening the National Centre for Tropical Diseases in its operational research and surveillance activities. (1994-2002)She believes that stronger synergies between health service managers and disease control programme managers can make health systems stronger.

 

Amina Essolbi

Amina Essolbi is a medical doctor with an MPH from Boston University.
She has worked for 5 years as medical officer before being recruited by USAID-Morocco as health care specialist (1994-98).
Thereafter, she joined the National School of Public Health (ENSP) in Morocco where she is a lecturer. She also teaches in different national and international short courses (VIH-AIDS, Ipact, continuing education) on matters related to strategic planning, project management, epidemiology and disease surveillance.

Her current domain of research is related to the role of home caregivers, the effects of free health care policies on the local health system and the conditions and mechanisms of success or failure of policy implementation.

 

Basile Keugoung

Basile Keugoung is a medical doctor, with a Master in Public Health in Health system management and policy from the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp-Belgium. He is registered as a PhD candidate at the Louvain Catholic University, Brussels-Belgium since 2010. He has a 10-year experience of working as a district medical officer in Cameroon. He is also co-facilitator of the Community of Practice Health Service Delivery (https://hhacops.org/cop-hsd-pss-bilingual/), and one of the Editors of the Newsletter ‘Politiques Internationales de Santé (www.santemondiale.org). His field of research is the interface between vertical programmes and the general health system. The aim is to find avenues for optimizing the interface between vertical programmes and the recipient health system.

 

Raoul Bermejo

Raoul Bermejo III, MD, MPH

Researcher, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, University of the Philippines College of Medicine.

PhD Student at the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium.

He is a medical doctor with experience in managing Reproductive, Maternal, and Child Health and Nutrition Programs in the Philippines. He also worked as a consultant for the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation. His current research work is focused on understanding how health systems in low and middle income countries are adapting to the rise in the burden of non-communicable diseases. He is also interested in global and local discussions on UHC.

When he is not thinking about global health problems, he dives and restores traditional Ifugao houses.

GHF2014 – PS16 – Unpacking Health Systems Through System Thinking

10:45
12:15
PS16 WEDNESDAY, 16 APRIL 2014 ROOM: 3 ICON_Talk
Unpacking Health Systems Through System Thinking
MODERATOR:
Dr. Taghreed Adam, MD, Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research (HSR), Health Systems and Innovation (HIS), World Health Organization, Switzerland
SPEAKERS:
Evaluating Systems-Thinking for District Managers : Ghana
Ms. Aku Kwamie, Researcher, Health Policy, Planning and Management, University of Ghana School of Public Health, Ghana
Understanding the Growing Complexity of Governing Immunization Services in Kerala, India
Dr. Joe Varghese, Post Doctoral Research Fellow, NCD Lifespan Training Program, Centre for Chronic Diseases Control
Dual Practice in Uganda: the Evolution and Management of a Complex Phenomenon
Dr. Ligia Paina Bergman, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, United States
Exploring Primary Care: System Dynamics in USA and Romania
Mrs. Andrada Tomoaia-Cotisel, PhD Candidate, Health Services Research & Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United States
Learning from Evidence: Advice-Seeking Behaviour Among Primary Health Care Physicians in Pakistan
Dr. Asmat Malik, Director Research and Development, Department of Research and Development, Integrated Health Services, Pakistan
OUTLINE:
PROFILES:

PS16_Taghreed_AdamDr. Taghreed Adam

Taghreed Adam is a Pediatrician and Health Economist. Having joined WHO in 1999, she focused on methodological and analytical developments in the areas of costing and the economic evaluation of health interventions. Her main research contributions include the multi-country evaluation of IMCI and the WHO-CHOICE project on cost-effectiveness analysis.  Dr Adam joined the Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research in February 2008. She leads various projects, notably research to advance the methods and application of “systems thinking” concepts in strengthening health systems of low-income and middle-income countries; and the Alliance’ portfolio on capacity strengthening of health policy and systems researchers. Before joining WHO, she worked with the Egyptian Ministry of Health in their Health Sector Reform Project, particularly in the development of a universal health insurance package for the Egyptian population.

AkuKwamieMs. Aku Kwamie

Aku Kwamie is a health systems researcher based at the University of Ghana School of Public Health. Her current area of research is district level governance. Ms Kwamie also has research interests in management and leadership, accountability, decentralisation, complexity science, and maternal and newborn health. She has worked internationally in community health settings in Ghana, Nigeria, Togo, Lesotho, and Canada. Ms Kwamie holds degrees from the University of Toronto and King's College London. She is currently completing her doctoral thesis.

PS16_Joe_VargheseDr. Joe Varghese

I am a NIH D43 Research Fellow associated with Centre for Chronic Disease Control, New Delhi and Rollin School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta. I have master and doctoral degree in public health from Achutha Menon Centre for Health Science Studies, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram and currently, undergoing MSc in Global Health Policy (Distance Learning), London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London. I have over 12 years of involvement in public health at the national level as a health system researcher, policy expert and program manager.  I am associated with Jan Swasthya Abhiyan, the Indian affiliate of People’s Health Movement. My research and publications are related to Panchayat Raj Institutions and health sector, sex ratio at birth of Delhi hospitals, public health ethics, analytical frameworks for public health policies & programs and immunization & health governance. My current interest and researches are in the area of policy priorities for NCD prevention and control, population level behaviour change interventions, complexity of public health governance and in the development and application of System Thinking frameworks for public health.

Ligia Paina 2014Dr. Ligia Paina Bergman

Ligia Paina is an Assistant Scientist in the International Health Department of the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH). Her research interests include health workforce policy, complex adaptive systems, and research and organizational capacity development in low and middle income countries.

Ligia's experience in global health is focused on health systems strengthening and health systems research.  As a Research Assistant at Johns Hopkins University, she has contributed to the design, management, and analysis of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods research studies. Prior to joining Johns Hopkins, Ligia worked as a Health System Advisor in the Office of Health, Infectious Diseases, and Nutrition at the U. S. Agency for International Development.

Ligia holds a PhD and a MHS in International Health - Health Systems from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.

PS16_Andrada_Tomoaia_CotiselMrs. Andrada Tomoaia-Cotisel

My long-term career goal is to improve population health via improving health systems (HS).  My PhD dissertation explores the impact of primary care structures on patients’ risk of hospitalization.  The purpose of my research is to make a robust assessment of the dynamic interactions of these health system components and resulting outcomes.  My first job in public health (PH) was studying the effect of exertional heat illness on Marine Corps recruits with Sickle Cell trait.  I saw the importance of PH in identifying and protecting vulnerable populations. As an undergraduate intern at the World Health Organization in Geneva, I observed the complex interactions between NGOs and national health ministries that characterize effective health systems. I observed the paramount role HS plays in PH. After graduation, as an unpaid, uninsured, USAID intern, I got sick.  I sought care from a local community health center. Grateful for their help, I soon found myself working at one such organization.  There, I witnessed up close how changes in the local health service delivery system, such as interdisciplinary preventive care, could result in higher quality care for patients and improve cost-effectiveness. I saw how HS improvement happens and made it my long term goal to participate, whether my career takes me in research, policy or practice – hopefully all of the above!

AsmatMalikDr. Asmat Malik

Dr. Asmat Ullah Malik, a medical doctor and health policy and systems analyst has an extensive experience of working in health system in Pakistan. He is currently heading the Research and Development Division of Integrated Health Services, Islamabad, Pakistan. His key research interests are in health policy, its translation into national health systems and programs and testing innovative strategies for strengthening health service delivery. He was awarded Rockefeller Foundation Bursary Award for his research work presented at Health Systems in Asia Conference held in Singapore in 2013. He was also awarded an Australian Development Scholarship by the Government of Australia for PhD in Health Policy and Systems (2007-2013). He was winner of ‘Emerging Voices’ essay competition organized by Institute of Tropical Medicine (ITM), Antwerp, Belgium in 2010.

 

GHF2014 – PS12 – Integrating Neonatal Care in Low Income Countries: the Big Place of the Very Small Babies

16:00
17:30
PS12 TUESDAY, 15 APRIL 2014 ROOM: LEMAN
ICON_Fishbowl
Integrating Neonatal Care in Low Income Countries:
the Big Place of the Very Small Babies

MODERATOR:
Dr. Marie-Claude Bottineau
MD, MPH & TM 
Pediatrician, Neonatology, Pediatrics Intensive Care, MSF CH, Geneva, Switzerland
SPEAKERS:
Dr. Anne Pittet, Pediatrician, Hôpital de l’Enfance à Lausanne and MSF CH, Geneva, Switzerland
Dr. Jean-Marie Choffat, Pediatrician, CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland
OUTLINE:
 Worldwide experience on the way to promote neonatal care in remote settings, humanitarian emergencies, post emergency programs, LIC… including policy and strategic planning, implementation, integration into MoH structures, task shifting, training course and handover.
PROFILES:

PS12_Dr_Marie_BottineauDr. Marie-Claude BOTTINEAU is a French Pediatrician with a DESS in Neonatology, a competency in Pediatrics Intensive Care and a Master Degree in Public Health and Tropical Medicine. She did the first part of her carrier working in General and University Hospitals in France as Pediatrician in Pediatrics, Pediatrics and Neonatal Intensive Care in Nantes, Nancy, Le Havre and Paris and her Tropical Medicine Degree in Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, with Pr Gentilini and Pr Duflo. She also studied Bio-Ethics in Paris as free auditor getting an equivalence of Master Degree.

In parallel, she was doing some regular missions around the world with several Humanitarian Organizations including MSF- France in Kosovo; Vietnam (Ho-Chi-Minh); Madagascar (Antananarivo); Nicaragua (Leon and Managua), during civil war; Nepal (Pokhara-Jomoson); India (Calcutta, slums of Howrah-Pilkhana) and Cameroon (Mpoundou, Abong-Mbang district).

From 1990 to 1996, she dedicated her carrier to the humanitarian action working exclusively in expatriation in different humanitarian contexts of which in Benin with Terre Des Hommes-Lausanne and in Angola with MSF-France (Uige and Benguela provinces during civil war).

After an urgent medical repatriation in December 1995, time for recovering, few months in HQ MSF-France in Paris and few years in Robert Debré Hospital (Pediatrics Emergencies and Neonatal SMUR), she was to the United States in order to complete her Master Degree in Public Health (2000). Then, she worked 2 years as Public Health Medical Specialist at CRED (Center for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters), UCL, Brussels, Belgium. At the same time she made several missions to Cambodia for the Belgium Cooperation and some consultancies as Evaluator within the European Commission for INCO-DEV and INCO-MED programs.

From 2001 to 2003 she made regular consultancies for WHO Geneva in Switzerland (Geneva) on GAVI (Global Alliance for Vaccines & Immunizations); Chad (Tanjile), Mali (Bamako) and Indonesia (Djakarta, Bali and Iles de la Sonde) on Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination (MNTE) including Lot Quality Assurance Surveys (LQAS).

From January 2003 to July 2007 she worked as UNHCR Senior Regional Health/Nutrition/HIV – AIDS Co-ordinator for West Africa based in Sierra Leone (Freetown) and Ghana (Accra), then the Great Lakes Region based in Burundi (Bujumbura) and at least Chad – Darfour Emergency, based in Chad (Abéché).

Mid July 2007, she was appointed as Pediatrics Referent in MSF-CH to develop pediatrics vision, policy and strategic approach and to give adequate support to pediatrics fields. In April 2011, she took the coordination and leadership of the MSF International Pediatrics Working Group and early 2014 the coordination of the Mother, Neonatal and Child pool including nutrition.

She taught extensively (H.E.L.P Course, in MSF, UNHCR, Universities...) and participated actively in international congresses making some abstracts, publications, posters, and/or oral communications.

She contributed for many years to the work of Amnesty International against Torture, acting with the Medical Commission. After different professional affiliations, she is currently active member of the Target Advisory Group (TAG) of the International Pediatrics Association (IPA) on Children in Humanitarian Disasters, of the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (PMNCH) (WHO, UNICEF, Save The Children...) and of the Group of Tropical Pediatrics (Société Francaise de Pédiatrie).

She got certificates of recognition from CDC Atlanta, H.E.L.P Course and the UNAM of Nicaragua for her action in emergency settings and/or her contribution to the teaching.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADr. Anne Pittet

After a pediatric specialization in Switzerland, I joined MSF OCG in 1999 for several field missions in Africa and Asia. I participated also to clinical studies in South Sudan and Myanmar. In 2005 I worked one year in Vietnam to help in the development of a neonatal project and I continue to follow up these activities.

Since 2006 I’m working 6 months a year with MSF and 6 months a year in the Pediatric Department of the University Hospital of Lausanne. Since 2011 I work with the Medical Department of MSF in Geneva and the Training Unit, performing formal training sessions, coaching, supervision and field visits in different countries of Africa, Asia and Haïti.

Voices of Iran: Evaluation of dietary habits and related factors among Type 2 diabetic patients.

Author(s) Roya Sadeghi1, Azar Tol2, Davoud Shojaeizadeh3, Bahram Mohebbi 4.
Affiliation(s) 1Health Education & promotion, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, 2Health Education & promotion, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran , Iran, 3Health Education & promotion, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, 4Cardiology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran 5.
Country - ies of focus Iran
Relevant to the conference tracks Advocacy and Communication
Summary Type 2 diabetes is a group of metabolic disorders which can be described as uncontrolled blood glucose levels. In Iran, the prevalence of type 2 diabetic was 2-10 percent in 2008 year. It is a controllable disease, and the role of lifestyle related factors has been considered vital as potentially modifiable determinants are influential. Type 2 diabetes is one of the largest and most common health problems in the world. There is an increasing trend in the incidence of diabetes in both developed and developing countries. Because of these and lack of evidence on dietary habits and related factors among type 2 diabetic patient in Iranian literatures, this study was aimed to assess dietary habits and its related factors.
Background Self-care is very important in diabetes control. Self-management remains one of the bases of diabetes self-care mechanism. As such SMBG, carbohydrate counting, activity regimens are important and essential tools for people living with diabetes. These factors should be individualized for each diabetes patient in everyday life.
Objectives The aim of this study was to assess dietary habits and its related factors among type 2 diabetic mellitus patients in order to design an effective nutrition intervention.
Methodology An analytical study was performed on 480 diabetic patients who were referred to four selected teaching hospitals affiliated of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in Tehran for a period of nine months in 2012. Patient's dietary habits were measured by a 51 items self-report instrument with four general questions about dietary habits and four subscales reflecting domains including general diabetes information (12 items), planning, shopping, and preparing meals (6 items), eating meals (17 items) and family influence on dietary habits (12 items). Collected data was analyzed by using SPSS software version 11.5. Results were considered significant at conventional p0.05 level.
Results Mean age of participants was 59.96± 11.53 years. Mean score of each domain was (53.72 ± 19.83), (57.31 ± 23.82), (52.27 ± 12.13), (64.72 ± 14.3) respectively. Family influence on dietary habits was highlighted as the most important domains in dietary habits instrument.
Study results revealed that there were significant association between four domains and socioeconomic and variables related to dietary habits.
Conclusion The important role of family influence on dietary habits among type 2 diabetic patients highlighted the role of perceived social support from family. The results of socio demographic variables posed the necessity of tailoring specific intervention programs accordingly.

Linking Health And Educations Measures To Improve Early Childhood Development Programmes: Kyrgyzstan.

Author(s) Anara Doolotova1, Jypara Ergeshbaeva2
Affiliation(s) 1Health department, Aga Khan Foundation, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, 2Health, Mountain Society Development Support Program, Osh, Kyrgyzstan.
Country - ies of focus Kyrgyzstan
Relevant to the conference tracks Women and Children
Summary Since 2005 AKF has been implementing an early childhood development (ECD) program targeting caregivers and preschool age children in three districts of Osh province. The focus of the programme has been to provide different models of preschool education, from government kindergartens to private, home-based care facilities and even yurt-based kindergartens in high pastures during the summer (jailoo). This programme develops cognitive, social and intellectual skills of children 0 to 8 but mainly focuses on the older age group, from 4 to 8. Beginning in 2013 the Health Program introduced health components in the education formats to protect and promote the health of pregnant women and children under 5.
What challenges does your project address and why is it of importance? According to DHS-KG (2012), only 56% of infants are exclusively breastfed, more than 18 % of children under 5 are stunted, and 33 percent of women of reproductive age and 39% of children age 6 to 59 months have some level of anemia. The integration of health elements with the cognitive components of education is designed to increase health promoting practices and to reduce the prevalence of poor health practices. The Kyrgyz Republic has not recognized a formal ECD agenda for children 0 to 3 years old. Policy-makers and caregivers/parents are not fully aware that promoting the health of the mother and investing in the early years of a child’s development generate a substantial return later in life. While such an investment is a rational for a low-income country like the Kyrgyz Republic, most communities believe that children do not need to be educated in the early years because they are too young to learn. Also, while women generally support measures to promote the development of the young child through health and education initiatives, most men do not understand and are not involved in the care and development of the young child.
How have you addressed these challenges? Do you see a solution? AKF implements programs in 35 pilot villages of three districts. It is a community based approach and relies on involving volunteers of parent support groups and health providers. Integrating the health initiatives in the existing early child development programmes enables women and their families to have full knowledge of the care needed during pregnancy, delivery and the postpartum period, and promotes practices such as exclusive breastfeeding, proper nutrition, parenting and nurturing that promote the development of the young child. To address these challenges AKF, KR has adapted an integrated health and education model that uses a multi-partner approach based on community involvement and innovative implementation techniques such as home-visits of parent support groups, involving instructors of mothers schools to work with young parents, addressing ECD and health issues to men and partners, developing IEC materials on ECD and other initiatives which were not presented in the country.
How do you know whether you have made a difference? The study will measure the project implementation results between ECD indicators of integrated health and education programs in 35 pilot village communities and non-pilot villages where only the education component is being implemented.
Annual M&E data will be compared against the baseline. The following indicators will be tracked to monitor progress and impact: % of caregivers practicing at least five responsive parenting techniques; % of families with access to Parent Resource Centers (PRC) services; % of M/F children 0-6 months who are exclusively breastfed in project areas; and % of mothers with children under 5 who know at least 3 ways to prevent enteric infections which includes the % of M/F community members who know that breastfeeding should be initiated at birth.
Have you or the project mobilized others and if so, who, why and how? To reach mothers-to-be, new mothers and very young children, AKF KR works through Mother Schools. These are ‘sessions’ that take place largely in health facilities where the ’pregnancy to parenting approach’ is provided for pregnant women and family members during antenatal visit at birth preparedness schools (Mother schools) which are a part of primary health care facilities. Mothers Schools teach couples about antenatal, childbirth and postpartum care but also the early needs of the young child during the first days of life. Mother schools instructors will be trained on measures to ensure proper growth and development in the earliest years of a Child’s life. Parents will be educated by trained physicians to take proper care of the young child, not only physical development but cognitive and social development as well. Trained health providers provide sessions to young parents. Parental Resource Centres address the developmental needs of somewhat older children, i.e., 0 to 8 years. The families of these children are encouraged to visit a village-based centre in village or school libraries where trained facilitators, e.g. librarians and facilitators, provide special learning sessions for parents. Health messages and other interventions are incorporated. These measures inform parents about good health and nutrition practices and contribute to the healthy development of children between 4 to 8 years old. The material developed reaches parents with children aged 0 to 8 and a wide range of topics are included as breastfeeding and complementary feeding, danger signs during first years of childhood, immunization, how to take properly care of children in addition to ECD day to day development. To improve the health status of WRA the following topics are presented: postpartum nutrition, contraception and depression, danger signs of postpartum period and the role of family members. Finally, all parents with children 0-8 are informed of methods to prevent anemia and micronutrient deficiency, which is very common among local communities, how to adopt good nutrition habits, how to use safe water and maintain proper hygiene and sanitation in the family. The libraries of the PRCs have a space where parents and children can have access to information and can adopt/adapt practical lessons and plays, read IEC materials and watch DVDs. The health unit will provide health IEC materials to complement Education program. Home Visits will be carried out to reach families who cannot attend the PRCs.
When your donor funding runs out how will your idea continue to live? When the AKF program ends, the community will continue to implement the activities because the local personnel of the parent resource centers, mother schools, community leaders, district authorities will have already built their capacity and will continue their duties in order to benefit families.

Report from GHF2012

The challenge from the Geneva Health Forum 2012 is to summarise what was an amazing few days of presentations, discussions and meetings of frontliners in health. 246 oral presentations including issues such as child obesity in Tunisia, innovative approaches of managing diabetes in Mali, how urbanisation is impacting people in Bangladesh, how atmospheric contamination is leading to increased hospitalisations in Barcelona, the challenges of over and under nutrition coexisting in the same societies and how noncommunicable diseases also exist in refugee and migrant populations, the challenge of access to medicines and the financial burden this means for many of the world’s poorest people and how the issues of justice and equity need to be included in the debate in how we address chronic conditions.

A total of 895 participants from 70 countries including policy makers, health professionals, academics and NGO frontliners all shared their view points and experiences and the sessions emphasised how complex the issue of chronic diseases is to address and that there is no magic bullet. Is it Youth empowerment or the use of new technologies? Is it redesigning health systems or putting more of an emphasis on primary health care? Is it addressing the way we all are living in a more sedentary and unhealthy environment or tackling the challenge in those who are most at risk? So many questions still remain after the Forum, but some key lessons:

  • Research and its role to sometimes highlight the obvious, but to be used as an effective tool for project implementation, monitoring and evaluation and policy change
  • Innovative approaches that are adapted to the context we work in, that are sustainable and scalable, but that technology should not drive the answer, but be one of many tools used
  • We need a multi-discipline and multi-disciplinary approach and this will require changing the way we think about chronic diseases, how we teach medical and nursing students about chronic diseases and how we move the issue of chronic diseases from being something purely dealt with by the health sector to truly a whole of government and society approach
  • The health systems clinicians work in, whether in Switzerland or Uganda need to be reorganised to address chronic diseases. This will require in some cases decentralisation of care to the primary health care level, development of new roles for health professionals, avoiding verticalisation and a disease based approach and integration of different aspects of the health system
  • The role partnerships will play in addressing this challenge is necessary, however we need to address issues of conflict of interest and trust, but these can be overcome

Hearing from people with chronic diseases, innovators, philosophers, health system specialists, researchers, health professionals or policy makers the common theme was putting the individual with the chronic condition, the beneficiary of our actions and activities at the centre for what we do. We are all working as was stated by Sridhar Venkatapuram for the noble cause of improving health, in addressing chronic conditions we must not forget that we are working to ensure that children in Nepal do not develop cardiovascular risk factors, that people with sickle cell disease receive the treatments they need, when they need them, and that the health system should work for and with the person for improved health and not be a barrier to this.

In the session on innovation Mahad Ibrahim argued that space for innovation is necessary and the aim of this edition of the Forum was to provide such a space. With the issues addressed during the Forum it was not only innovative work that was presented, but also the approach to learning and sharing ideas at the Forum and not letting individual’s expertise get in the way of new ideas.

After the session on health systems Andy Williamson said he felt encouraged after having heard from a policy maker, an academic, someone working for an NGO and a clinician in a hospital. The challenge is great, but the inspiring and innovative approaches presented at the Forum show us what can be done and that the lessons presented will help in addressing chronic diseases in different settings and make a change to the lives of people living with chronic diseases throughout the world.

Reporting at the Geneva Health Forum also took an innovative and participative approach. Different participants contributed not only in terms of feedback on the sessions on content and quality, but were also able to give their perspectives on the content presented. Students from Boston University for example prepared presentations on their experience and what they learnt at the Forum. Students from the University of Geneva’s Institute of media, communication and journalism also attended some sessions and provided insight into how experts in the field of health communicate on certain issues. Travel grantees and other key participants reported on the sessions they attended by adding their view to the issues addressed. All this material is presented in the final report from the 2012 edition and the issues raised in this report will shape the discussions and content of the Geneva Health Forum in 2014.

Comprehensive Assessment and Management of Hypertensive Patients in Primary Healthcare Facilities of Guatemala

Author(s): C. Mendoza Montano*1, P. Orellana2, A. de Arroyo3, M. Ramirez Zea4
Affiliation(s): 1Health Promotion, 2Medicine, 3Epidemiology, Guatemalan Association for the Prevention of Heart Diseases-APRECOR, 4Chronic Diseases, Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama CAP, Guatemala, Guatemala
Keywords: Chronic diseases, cardiovascular diseases, risk factors, hypertension, health system interventions.
Background:

In Guatemala, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are becoming the leading cause of mortality and disability. The rising burden of these diseases makes it imperative to formulate effective community and health system-based interventions. Currently, the primary healthcare (PHC) system in Guatemala is mostly oriented to communicable diseases and maternal/child health so public PHC centres lack adequate programmes to cope with the increasing demand of CVD.

Summary/Objectives:

The objective of the study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a comprehensive CVD risk reduction programme targeting patients with hypertension that could be integrated into the PHC facilities of Guatemala. The programme was designed for assessment, CVD risk stratification and management of adult individuals detected to have hypertension through opportunistic screening. Patients were stratified at low, medium and high risk based on the level of blood pressure and the presence or absence of other simple, non-invasive variables such as age, personal and family history of CVD, waist circumference (WC) and tobacco use. All patients received lifestyle counselling including smoking cessation, promotion of healthy diet and physical activity. Drug therapy with an antihypertensive medication was restricted to patients at high cardiovascular risk.

Results:

A total of 114 patients (54 ± 13 years old, 74% women and 26% men) were enrolled during a 6 months period at the public PHC clinic of the community of Villa Nueva. Seventy patients were followed up with a second visit to the clinic, and 43 with a third visit. Significant reductions were observed during the first follow up (36 ± 18 days later) in the group mean systolic blood pressure (from 164.9 ± 27.7 to 150.0 ± 21.0, p < 0.01 mmHg) and was even higher during the second follow up (168.0 ± 27.0 to 138.1 ± 17.3, p < 0.01). WC did not change during the first follow up (97.1 ± 8.4 to 95.2 ± 8.8cm, p = 0.14); however, a significant reductions were achieved (from 97.1 ± 8.4 to 93.2 ± 6.9, p=0.04) in patients (N=40) who had 3 visits to the clinic (71±20 days later). Of the 13 tobacco users, 7 discontinued use (53%).

Lessons learned:

This pilot study provides preliminary evidence of the effectiveness and feasibility of incorporating a CVD risk reduction programme into the limited healthcare infrastructure of Guatemala and probably applies to other developing countries.

Child Sufferings and Health Inequalities: An Outcome of Poverty and Financial Constraints in the Rural-Urban Perspective

Author(s): F. Naseem*1, I. Z. Qureshi2, M. N. Adnan3, A. Rashid4
Affiliation(s): 1Science and Mathematics, Govt. Degree College for Women, B-Block, Satellite Town, Rawalpindi, Rawalpindi, 2Biological Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, 3Geography Department, F.G. Postgraduate College (Men), H-8, Islamabad, 4Department of Environmental Sciences, PMAS Arid Agriculture, University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan
Keywords: Health equity, child mortality, infection control, paediatric medicine
Background:

Wide spread disparities between rural and urban areas regarding access to health facilities are common in developing countries. Expending financial resources with less focus on rural areas has caused several complications among infants and overall children health. A continuous monitoring is required to assess the arising illness problems which are not comprehended by even parents of these children. This has become particularly important in the context of poverty, literacy and health-care quality gap that exist between rural and urban population.

Summary/Objectives:

For this work we selected an urban centre near Mansehra District (located in Tehsil Balakot) and its adjacent rural part. Survey of clinics and paediatric units at local hospitals was conducted and 69 families were interviewed. Our focus was to compare the health services infrastructure and quality of medical care that children of rural and urban areas are getting. In particular we aimed to investigate infection control policies practised by the child healthcare units. Effort was also made to highlight child health disparities in the study area on the basis of data collected regarding commons illness among children, their diet related anomalies and infant mortality rate.

Results:

Compare to urban child environment, a high degree of pathogens and most common health-care-associated infection sites were observed rural areas. The former area revealed lower percentage of child illnesses for all indicators except dental problems (Figure). We observed a wide gap for nutrition related anomalies and access to antibiotics mainly because of poverty in rural population. Few health outlets with inadequate number of child specialists in the study area of rural part have aggravated child mortality and infection control problems which was not fully considered in paediatric medicine. In addition, rural population complained for treatment without taken into account the specificity of the needs and environment of the paediatric patient.

Lessons learned:

Comparison of rural and urban health facilities revealed widespread disparity that has strong influence on child health. Due to less purchasing power in rural population, antibiotics were not available in medical stores and neither were offered free of cost at local hospitals. Consequently in future it seems that immunological naivety of young children, especially neonates will translates into an enhanced susceptibility to many infections. In particular, respiratory illnesses and under nutrition would a challenge for rural local health authorities. We suggest urgent interventions on infection control practices in resource-limited settings and emphasize on inclusion of microbiologist in the infection control team and antibiotic policies.